Past Exhibits

"Painting What We Feel: a Collection of Abstract Works of Art"


"Painting What We Feel: a Collection of Abstract Works of Art"

Artists in the show: Centre County artists include Jean Forsberg, Melinda Harr Curley, Nancy Toepfer, and Susan Graham. Other geographic regions are represented by Holly Rae Taylor of Vermont, Karin Kreuser of Bremen, Germany, and Donald Charles Karwelis of Orange County, California.

Abstract Art can be defined has art work created to achieve its effect without representing external reality but rather using shapes, textures, colors, and brush strokes to convey a message. Abstract Art is bold and energetic focusing on expressive freedom. The works can invoke a variety of reactions from viewers. Some are mesmerizing and others stimulate a thrilling experience. Works included in this show have been created on canvas, some on glass and others on paper.
"Must we not then renounce the object altogether, throw it to the winds and instead lay bare the purely abstract?", Vasily Kandinsky, 1911.

Artistic independence became a reality during the early years of the 20th century. Although some early 20th Century American and European artists like Kandinsky are credited with first presenting Abstract Art, much of the art of earlier cultures are abstract forms. Decorations on pottery, ceremonial masks, textiles, wall and rock inscriptions and paintings are simple, geometric, and bold abstract representations, which might have had symbolic purpose.

This exhibition demonstrates that abstraction occurs in a continuum; some works include geometric forms and figures while other works defy the inclusion of any recognizable form.

Windows Gallery - 1st Floor

Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: 12:00 to 4:30 p.m.
Sep 29
thru
Nov 26
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"Saddle Up: Art and Artifacts of the Old West"


Capture the spirit of the historic “American West” with paintings, photography and artifacts. This is the story of the western expansion primarily during the second half of the 19th century. It's the history of the pioneers moving across the Native American lands, opening new frontiers and causing devastating changes to native life. It is also the stories cowboys: of true grit versus the romantic myth of the American Cowboy. The exhibition is a chance to step back in history, feeling life on the range and the explorations of the frontier.

Landscape paintings and photographs document the beauty of the native lands including dramatic scenes of majestic mountains and stark deserts. Artifacts serve to give a glimpse of trail life with saddles, blankets, and spurs. There are even some scenes from classic western movies like The Magnificent Seven and Tombstone.

Let the visuals be your story teller. The historic west became the home to many people with a variety of customs, beliefs and ways of living. Even though exploring new lands and setting trails for future travelers is a thing of the past, the westward expansion has given way to a timeless legacy of adventure, exploration and true grit.

Programming to accompany the exhibition includes music, storytelling, poetry:
Richard Sleigh will play guitar and sing on August 6th and Rowen Casey from Nashville will play the Fiddle on September 10th.

Windows Gallery - 1st Floor

Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: 12:00 to 4:30 p.m.
Aug 4
thru
Sep 24
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Artworks by William (Billy) Mills, Special Talents & Special Needs


The exhibition is a large collection of paintings by self taught artist, Billy Mills, who lived from 1918 to 2002. Mills lived in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, during his life. He was a well known local hero who lived with severe difficulties. He could not hear nor speak. However, his art works were compelling, demonstrating talent and skills in creating works representing family and community and landmarks of the area. Mills story is an inspirational and amazing story of how desire and talent supersedes difficulties. His talents helped him enable others to see the world more clearly. The story is a tribute to the human spirit and to the idea that humans have many gifts, and some are not even realized.

Mills art style varies from photorealistic to impressionistic works. The exhibition will feature works from several periods of his life and interests. He sold his works at local galleries especially the Adam and Art Gallery in Bellefonte; now closed. He lived at, and worked in the laundry room of, Centre Crest and his story is one of love found when he met Sara C Lee, whom he married and they lived together until her death in 1986.

The exhibition at the Bellefonte Art Museum will be curated by guest curators and art collectors, Doctors Gay and James Dunne. The Dunne's were friends and supporters of Mills. They featured and sold his artworks in their gallery.

This is a rare opportunity to learn about a popular artist with special needs and members of our community whose lives he affected.

Windows Gallery - 1st Floor

Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 12:00 - 4:30 p.m. OR By Appointment
Jan 6
thru
Feb 26
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